Free Printable Washing Instructions for Knitwear!

Washing Labels

I recently filled a large wholesale order for a local business and one of my requirements was to have proper packaging and washing instructions, as my items were all wearable accessories. This was a little scary as I barely know how to properly do laundry. Those little washing symbols are an alien language in my opinion.

After careful consideration and much research, I found a chart with the washing symbols I needed for my products. A little snipping here and there, some cute GoogleFonts, and I had my labels made!

These were difficult for me to make, as I am sure it would be for others out there, so I’d like to share them with you! Feel free to make as many as you need. It is saved as a JPEG picture file, so you won’t be able to edit it very easily. It would be a shame not to share this!

Washing Labels

Simply click on the picture and it will open up into a new window. Make them as big or as small as you’d like!

Enjoy your upcoming weekend!

Chubby Amigurumi Kitty Pattern!

Happy Sunday! I have a small story to share today, and this is especially geared towards those of you with online stores or artisans who specialize in handmade items. Always take custom orders! I know they can sometimes be a pain in the butt. Every now and then though, you do come across a gem that is worth replicating. In all honesty, when I first opened my store I ONLY took custom orders. I had no idea what I was doing or what was popular, so I was basing it entirely on what people were ordering. That’s how I came up with this pattern.

A friend of mine desperately wanted a crocheted/amigurumi kitty to give to her mom, but I couldn’t find a pattern anywhere. I took on the job because she was a friend, but it took me a while to actually experiment and write the pattern. The first kitty I made took me about 3 or 4 hours to finish because I was fiddling with every little aspect of the pattern, trying to make it perfect. I posted a picture of it on my page, and was immediately swamped with orders. Apparently people like cats?! Now it takes me about 2 hours or less to complete one of these. Perfect for a lazy Sunday afternoon!

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I really like this pattern for a few reasons:

One: I wrote it. I have only ever published and shared a few of my patterns before, so whenever I do, it’s always very exciting!

Two: This pattern is totally customizable! Make a rainbow kitty. Make a striped kitty! Make a kitty with no tail! Do whatever you want!

Three: This pattern also serves as a great “basic body” pattern. Use the head/body and legs portions, and get creative. Change up the tail a little, make a round nose, and you’ve pretty much got a pig. Make rounded ears and a little bit of a thicker tail, and you’ve got a dog. The possibilities are endless.

This pattern can be purchased through either my Craftsy store or my Ravelry store. I know you don’t need a Ravelry account to purchase from there, but I believe you do need a Craftsy account to purchase from that particular platform.

Either way, it’s a great idea to make an account for one or both of these websites because there is a ton of free content available through other crafters. Another thing I love about them is that they track your pattern purchases and save them to an “online library” for you. You obviously are given the option to download the patterns directly to your personal computer, but if you ever get a new computer or it crashes or something, you still have your patterns! Technology is a blessed thing!

Share your finished products with me in the comments, or let me know if there are any issues with the pattern. I will be happy to assist! I can’t wait to see what you come up with. And feel free to follow me on either of my accounts. Let’s be friends!

Craftsy username: tiaoostenbrug

Ravelry username: Tia Oostenbrug/tiaamaee

Free Crochet Amigurumi Bunny Rabbit Pattern

In celebration of Labour Day, I have decided to release a free pattern!

Last Easter I was searching for a cute rabbit pattern, but wasn’t having much luck. After much digging I came across a super cute pattern, except it wasn’t written in English. So after a few hours of trying to translate, testing the pattern, and making a few of my own revisions, I had it put together in something that I could understand! If you are interested in checking out the original pattern in its original language, you can do that here.

If you aren’t big into crochet but still really want one of these adorable bunny rabbits, you can purchase one from my Etsy shop by clicking this link!

Without any further adieu, here is my first FREE pattern!

Amigurumi Bunny Rabbit
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Notes

This is a great pattern because you can make it in any yarn weight with any corresponding hook size. You will just get a larger bunny the thicker yarn you use, and vice versa. Gauge is not important!

The head and body are made in one piece. All other pieces are made separately and then stitched on afterwards. Eyes can be either stitched on or plastic safety eyes.

The finished product will be anywhere from 6-10 inches tall.

Supplies

  • Yarn in your choice of colour and weight (I used Caron “Simply Soft” in Soft Blue and only used about 50 yards)
  • Small amount of white yarn for tail
  • Small amount of pink yarn for nose
  • Small amount of black yarn for eyes OR safety eyes in your choice of size (I used 7 mm eyes)
  • Corresponding crochet hook (I used G/6-4.25 mm)
  • Polyfil stuffing (or similar product)
  • Yarn needle
  • Scissors

Abbreviations

  • sc – single crochet
  • ch – chain
  • sl st – slip stitch
  • inc – increase (2 single crochets in one)
  • dec – decrease (crochet 2 together)

Head and Body 

Round 1: Magic circle with 6 sc, join with a sl st in first sc, ch 1, turn (6)

Round 2: Inc in each sc, join with a sl st in first sc, ch 1, turn (12)

Round 3: *sc, inc, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc, ch 1, turn (18)

Round 4: * 2 sc, inc, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc, ch 1, turn (24)

Round 5: *3 sc, inc, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc, ch 1, turn (30)

Round 6: *4 sc, inc, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc, ch 1, turn (36)

Round 7-11: sc around, continue joining with a sl st in first sc of each round, ch 1, turn (36)

Attach safety eyes in roughly round 9 or 10, and sew a pink X for a nose in roughly round 10 or 11

Round 12: * sc 4, dec, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc, ch 1, turn (30)

Round 13: * sc 3, dec, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc, ch 1, turn (24)

Stuff head

Round 14: * sc 2, dec, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc, ch 1, turn (18)

Round 15: * sc, dec, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc, ch 1, turn (12)

Round 16: * 2 sc, dec, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (9)

Round 17: * sc 2, inc, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc, ch 1, turn (12)

Round 18: * sc, inc, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (18)

Round 19: * sc 2, inc, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (24)

Round 20-22: sc around, continue joining with a sl st in first sc of each round, ch 1, turn (24)

Stuff body

Round 23: * sc 2, dec, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (18)

Round 24: * sc, dec, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (12)

Round 25: dec around, join with a sl st in first sc of round (6)

Fill with any more stuffing you can and fasten off. Weave in ends.

Legs (Make 2)

Round 1: Magic circle with 6 sc, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (6)

Round 2: inc in each, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (12)

Round 3: * sc, inc, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (18)

Round 4-5: sc in each, continue joining with a sl st in first sc of each round, ch 1, turn (18)

Round 6: * sc, dec, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (12)

Round 7: dec around, join with a sl st in first sc of round, fasten off (6)

Leave roughly an 8 inch tail for attaching to body

Arms (Make 2)

Round 1: Magic Circle with 4 sc, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (4)

Round 2: inc in each, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (8)

Round 3: sc in each, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (8)

Round 4: * sc 2, dec, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (6)

Round 5: sc in each, join with a sl st in first sc of round, fasten off (6)

Leave roughly an 8 inch tail for attaching to body

Ears (Make 2)

Round 1: Magic Circle with 5 sc, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (5)

Round 2: inc in each, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (10)

Round 3: * sc, inc, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (15)

Round 4-5: sc in each, continue joining with a sl st in first sc of each round, ch 1, turn (15)

Round 6: * sc 3, dec, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (12)

Round 7-9: sc in each, continue joining with a sl st in first sc of each round, ch 1, turn (12)

Round 10: * sc, dec, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (9)

Round 11: sc around, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (9)

Round 12: * sc, dec, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc of round, fasten off (6)

Leave roughly an 8 inch tail for attaching to body

Tail (Make in white or your choice of colour)

Round 1: Magic Circle with 4 sc, join with a sl st in first sc of round, ch 1, turn (4)

Round 2: * sc, inc, repeat from *, join with a sl st in first sc of round, fasten off (6)

Leave roughly an 8 inch tail for attaching to body

Assembly

Now that you have your body put together and all of the body parts made, it’s time to assemble your bunny rabbit! I like to sew on the arms and legs first so I have a good idea of where my center is on the body. Stuff the arms and legs with a little bit of polyfil (or other stuffing). Use your yarn needle to sew arms and legs in proper spots (you can follow my picture for a guide). Pull yarn tight to close up any holes in the join. Knot and weave in ends.

Next, sew on the ears. I find it helps to attach both ears with sewing pins to ensure that they are even before sewing them down. Again, you can follow my picture for  guide! Do not stuff the ears! I mean, you can if you’d like too, but they will be way too heavy and won’t stay up nice and straight. Pull yarn tight to close up any holes in the join. Knot and weave in ends.

Lastly, sew on the tail. This is probably the easiest part, but it is important to leave it for last so you can make sure it is directly in the center of the body. Use the arms, legs, and ears to help guide you. Pull yarn extra tight. This will make the tail poof up a bit and look more rounded. Knot and weave in ends.

Ta daa! You have an adorable bunny rabbit! Please let me know if you have any questions regarding this pattern and I will do my best to help. Also, let me know if there are any parts of the pattern that don’t make any sense. This is the first pattern I have written so I’m sure there are some mistakes somewhere, or steps that don’t make sense.

Enjoy your Labour Day! Share any pictures of your amigurumi bunny rabbits with me in the comments!

*Note: This pattern was written for the intent to share with everyone. You may sell any finished products using this pattern, but please credit my page accordingly. Please do not redistribute this pattern as your own.

First post, here we go!

A blog. Wow. This is some serious stuff.

I have had blogs in the past as a young teen where I typed away about my troubles and wrote short stories and such, but never have I done anything like this. I am committing to this. I am determined to make this work.

All my life I have been creative. I am pretty sure I learned how to draw and colour before I was able to speak. Unfortunately, I wasn’t the best at drawing and painting, so I ventured out to discover different hobbies that required some creativity. During my search I stumbled across baking, knitting, and crocheting.

My grandmother kindly taught me how to knit when I was about 6 years old. I knit a scarf for my Barbie doll and promptly put my needles away. I picked it up again when I was about 10 years old and made a few ugly scarves for my family which they kindly wore for me, regardless of how much they itched due to the cheap dollar store yarn. I didn’t really get into knitting until I was about 15 and I started knitting gifts for my friends. These were a little nicer than the “dollar store chic” beauties I made when I was younger.

Eventually my friends and family convinced me to start my own little business featuring the scarves and other fashion accessories I was knitting. This stayed pretty small for a year or two as I figured out the logistics of running a business while still trying to go to high school, attend clubs, go to dance practice, etc. Priorities!

I am a self-taught crocheter, which I think is pretty cool. I found learning how to crochet extremely difficult. Everyone crochets differently! This was so hard for me to wrap my head around as I watched countless hours of YouTube tutorials on basic stitches and still could not figure them out. Eventually I caved and took a few lessons from my local Michaels which straightened out most of my issues. I love writing my own patterns and creating new things. I almost prefer crocheting to knitting. It seems so much more versatile.

I have always loved baking, but was also afraid of baking. I thought that if I screwed up anything in the recipe that the entire thing would be ruined. It took a few accidents that turned out not to be accidents to realize that baking really isn’t that scary. Now I bake so much that my family gets mad at me. Who would have guessed?

Baking turned into cake decorating, which turned into more “from-scratch-creating-my-own-recipe-trust-me-its-delicious” baking, which turned into cooking. Don’t ask me how it happened,  but it did. I’m pretty sure it had to do with me getting older. I suddenly was in the position that required me to make my own meals and had no idea how to make anything other than scrambled eggs (which at the time, were not nearly as delicious as what I can make now. A post will come soon about scrambled eggs). I love cooking and trying new recipes, as well as creating my own. Sometimes all it takes is a little bravery and a risk here and there, and you can create something amazing.

So I had all of these hobbies and things that I felt I was pretty good at. My friends and family loved my hobbies because it got them cuddly scarves and cupcakes, but I didn’t know what to do with my knowledge. You can only knit randomly for so long. One of the questions I get asked the most is, “How do you do it?” I usually just bashfully shrug and titter. I felt embarrassed to be so young and better at being a homemaker than some middle-aged women. It took me a long time to realize that what I know is actually useful, and I have decided it’s time to share.

This is a big step for me, but I am finally going to answer the question. This is how I do it.